Article Listing

Issue 18.2

HIV 2018: the complex picture

Welcome to the Summer issue of HIV Nursing. I always consider this as the conference issue, it’s a good selling point when I ask people to write for it and as it’s our 20th Annual NHIVNA conference we have a bumper one for you.

HIV Nursing 2018: 18(2); 23.



Shaun Watson
Clinical Nurse Specialist (HIV Community)

Trans:Mission A community-led HIV testing initiative for trans people and their partners at a London sex-on-premises venue

Studies indicate that transgender (trans) communities are particularly vulnerable to HIV. However, trans people in the UK are often excluded from HIV services and research. This evaluation reviews the activity of a trans-led team that provided monthly outreach testing at a trans sex-on-premises venue in London.

HIV Nursing 2018: 18(2); 24–29.



Aedan Wolton, Richard Cameron, Tara Suchak
cliniQ CIC,Chelsea and Westminster Hospital NHS Foundation Trust London,cliniQ

HIV testing in primary care: a small-scale qualitative study to gain understanding

A qualitative research study was used with primary care clinicians to ascertain knowledge, understanding and current practices of clinicians to promote HIV testing of high-risk individuals in primary care. Using semi-structured interviews (n=7) the questioning focused on HIV testing guidelines, prevalence, late diagnosis and perceptions of where best to test. Interview data were thematically analysed.

HIV Nursing 2018; 18(2): 30–32.



Rebecca Kelly & Joanne Garside
Registered Nurse Adult & Principal Lecturer, University of Huddersfield

Working with boys and young men: relationships, sex and identity

From briefly exploring a host of issues pertinent to working professionally with boys and young men (BYM) in any number of contexts, this article will discuss the benefits of working holistically with BYM within a sexual health environment.

HIV Nursing 18: 18(2): 33–37.



Oliver O'Donohoe
Metro Charity UK

HIV complex care and care coordination: the nurse’s role

Over the past 30 years treatment for HIV has developed to a point where today, people living with HIV now have a near normal lifespan. However, living and ageing with HIV, just like the general ageing population, means that healthcare professionals are now managing, supporting and caring for a group of people who are at risk of developing increasing numbers of comorbidities and complexities.

HIV Nursing 2018: 18(2); 38–46.

Shaun Watson
Clinical Nurse Specialist (Community)