Current Issue - Articles

Issue 18.3

Joint working to treat hepatitis C in hard-to-reach patients who are co-infected: a case study example

As a result of shared routes of transmission, at least one quarter of people living with HIV globally are also infected with hepatitis C (HCV) and the rate of co-infection in the UK is estimated to be approximately 9%. Hepatitis C does not have an effect on HIV progression, but despite advances in treatment, patients who are co-infected with HIV and HC are still at higher risk of developing liver cirrhosis.

HIV Nursing 2018; 18: 63–66.



Lindsay Chalmers, Sara Lamond , Linda Panton
Blood Borne Virus Clinical Nurse Specialist, NHS Lothian, Edinburgh, NHS Lothian,Senior Charge Nurse, NHS Lothian

HIV co-infections: TB, HCV and HBV

Immunodeficiency caused by suboptimally treated HIV infection increases the risk of additional concurrent infections, both opportunistic and those that occur in spite of a relatively robust immune system. In relation to the latter, this article identifies three such infections that continue to cause significant morbidity and mortality in people living with HIV globally.

HIV Nursing 2018; 18: 70–76



Juliet Bennett
Independent Nurse Advisor

HIV Nursing

Sharing best practice in HIV care

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