New treatments for HIV and hepatitis C co-infection and the impact in nursing practice

Ricky Gellissen
Clinical Nurse Specialist, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust

There have been significant developments in how chronic hepatitis C (HCV) can be treated in the last few years, since the advent of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) (Figure 1).
The current BHIVA guidelines on the management of hepatitis viruses in adults infected with HIV were published in January 2014 [1]. At this time there were two DAAs for chronic hepatitis C (HCV) genotype 1 patients that had received both European Medicines Agency (EMA) and National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) approval: telaprevir [2] and boceprevir [3]. Since then, new data have been presented confirming the benefits of individual DAAs with pegylated interferon (PEG) and ribavirin (RBV); and DAAs in combination, in interferon-sparing regimens, with or without ribavirin, for the treatment of chronic HCV. There are now several of these DAAs that have received EMA approval, with other drugs in the pipeline, which are likely to be licensed in 2015. BHIVA provided a consensus statement on the guidelines on the management of hepatitis viruses in adults infected with HIV in September 2014 [1], addressing the impact of these developments on the management of both acute and chronic HCV/HIV co-infection, and upon patient choices and decisions on treatment. Read more. . .