The effectiveness of workplace interventions to reduce HIV-related stigma amongst healthcare professionals

Megan Hill1 and Catrin Evans2
1Staff Nurse, The Royal London Hospital; 2Associate Professor, University of Nottingham

Abstract
Aim: To undertake a systematic review and critically appraise research to investigate the effectiveness of workplace interventions to reduce HIV-related stigma amongst healthcare providers. Methods: An electronic search was conducted to find relevant research studies using pre-determined inclusion criteria and a structured search strategy. Nine studies were identified and critically appraised, and the data were extracted and synthesised into five measured outcomes. Results: The studies examined a range of measurable outcomes to investigate the impact interventions had on five manifestations of stigma, including general attitudes and stigma towards people living with HIV (PLWH), willingness to care for PLWH, enacted stigma, compounded stigma and fear-based stigma. Eight of the nine studies showed a reduction in HIV-related stigma amongst healthcare workers. Conclusion: The evidence from this review shows a great deal more research needs to be undertaken, all using the same, validated measurement tool of stigma, and research needs to be done to investigate the biomedical and health effects stigma-reducing interventions have on PLWH.